NNI Supplement to the President's 2014 Budget

Subject Area:
NNI Budget
Author: NSTC/CoT/NSET
Publication Date: May. 14 2013

Description:

The President’s 2014 Budget provides over $1.7 billion for the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), a sustained investment in support of the President’s priorities and innovation strategy. Cumulatively totaling almost $20 billion since the inception of the NNI in 2001 (including the 2014 request), this support reflects nanotechnology’s potential to significantly improve our fundamental understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale and to translate that knowledge into solutions to critical national issues. NNI research efforts are guided by two strategic documents developed by the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), the 2011 NNI Strategic Plan and the 2011 NNI Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Strategy. These strategic documents guide how NNI agencies address the full range of nanotechnology research and development, technology transfer and product commercialization, infrastructure and education, as well as the societal issues that accompany an emerging technology. The investments in 2012 and 2013 and those proposed for 2014 continue the emphasis on accelerating the transition from basic R&D to innovations that support national priorities.

This document provides supplemental information to the President’s 2014 Budget and serves as the Annual Report on the NNI called for in the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act (P.L. 108-153, 15 USC §7501). The report also addresses the requirement for Department of Defense reporting on its nanotechnology investments, per 10 USC §2358 (see Appendix A). In particular, the report summarizes NNI programmatic activities for 2012 and 2013, as well as those currently planned for 2014.

NNI budgets for 2012–2014 are presented by agency and PCA in Chapter 2 of this report. Information on the use of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) program funds to support nanotechnology research and commercialization activities, also called for in P.L. 108-153, is included at the end of Chapter 2. Activities that have been undertaken and progress that has been made toward achieving the four goals set out in the NNI Strategic Plan, activities in support of the NNI Nanotechnology Signature Initiatives (NSIs), changes in the balance of investments by PCA, and highlights from external reviews of the NNI and how their recommendations are being addressed, are presented in Chapters 3–6.


Nanotechnology Fact

Nanotechnology is used in many commercial products and processes, for example, nanomaterials are used to manufacture lightweight, strong materials for applications such as boat hulls, sporting equipment, and automotive parts. Nanomaterials are also used in sunscreens and cosmetics.

Nanostructured products are used to produce space-saving insulators which are useful when size and weight is at a premium—for example, when insulating long pipelines in remote places, or trying to reduce heat loss from an old house. Nanostructured catalysts make chemical manufacturing processes more efficient, by saving energy and reducing waste.

In healthcare, nanoceramics are used in some dental implants or to fill holes in diseased bones, because their mechanical and chemical properties can be “tuned” to attract bone cells from the surrounding tissue to make new bone. Some pharmaceutical products have been reformulated with nanosized particles to improve their absorption and make them easier to administer. Opticians apply nanocoatings to eyeglasses to make them easier to keep clean and harder to scratch and nanoenabled coatings are used on fabrics to make clothing stain-resistant and easy to care for.

Almost all high-performance electronic devices manufactured in the past decade use some nanomaterials. Nanotechnology helps build new transistor structures and interconnects for the fastest, most advanced computing chips.

All told, nanotechnologies are estimated to have impacted $251 billion across the global economy in 2009. This is estimated to grow to $2.4 trillion by 2015 (Lux Research, 2010).

For more information, see Benefits and Applications.

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