United States International Trade Commission (USITC)

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) is an independent, quasi judicial Federal agency with broad investigative responsibilities on matters of trade. The Commission (1) administers U.S. trade remedy laws within its mandate in a fair and objective manner; (2) provides the President, The U.S. Trade Representative and Congress with independent analysis, information, and support on matters of tariffs, international trade, and U.S. competitiveness; and (3) maintains the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS).

Research
Focus

The USITC serves as a federal resource where trade data and other trade policy-related information are gathered and analyzed. The information and analysis are provided to the President, the Office of the United States Trade Representative, and the Congress to contribute to the development of sound and informed U.S. trade policy. The USITC makes most of its information and analysis available to the public to promote understanding of international trade issues.

Key
Contacts

Elizabeth R. Nesbitt, International Trade Analyst for Biotechnology and Nanotechnology
Office of Industries
T: 202-205-3355
elizabeth.nesbitt(at)usitc.gov

Peg O'Laughlin
Office of External Relations
T: 202-205-1819
margaret.olaughlin(at)usitc.gov


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