Listing of FY 2009 nanotechnology-related environmental, health, and safety research projects

Subject Area:
NNI Publications and Reports
EHS-related Documents
Author: NSET/NEHI
Publication Date: Oct. 20 2011

Description:

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) requested that NNI agencies provide the NSET Subcommittee with detailed information on EHS research projects funded in FY 2009. These data were used to identify areas of strength or need when formulating the 2011 NNI EHS Research Strategy. Summaries of the data on these EHS projects are presented by core EHS research category in Chapters 2-6 of the NNI EHS Research Strategy, and six examples of research progress are highlighted in this document. A complete listing of the FY 2009 research projects is available here:  (1) totals of individual projects may vary from the summary tables due to rounding and (2) informatics and modeling is a new core area and so was not part of the data call. Please contact Liesl Heeter, NNCO, with questions about the tables.

The reader should note the difference between the scopes of the research included in this OMB-requested project data reported for FY 2009 and that reported for environmental, health, safety, and risk mitigation as a part of Program Component Area 7 in the annual NNI Supplement to the President’s Budget.

Further description of this data call is available in the NNI EHS Research Strategy, p. 7.


Nanotechnology Fact

Nanoscale materials have been used for over a millenium. For example, nanoscale gold was used in stained glass in Medieval Europe and nanotubes were found in blades of swords made in Damascus. However, ten centuries passed before high-powered microscopes were invented, allowing us to see things at the nanoscale and begin working with materials at the nanoscale.

Nanotechnology as we now know it began about 30 years ago, when our tools to image and measure extended into the nanoscale. Around the turn of the millennium, government research managers in the United States and other countries observed that physicists, biologists, chemists, electrical engineers, optical engineers, and materials scientists were working on overlapping issues emerging at the nanoscale. In 2000, the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) was created to help these researchers benefit from each other’s insights and accelerate the technology’s development.

To learn more, see What is Nanotechnology?

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