Strategy for Nanotechnology-Related Environmental, Health, and Safety Research (2008)

Subject Area:
NNI Strategic Documents
EHS-related Documents
Author: Subcommittee on Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology, Committee on Technology, National Science and Technology Council
Publication Date: Feb. 13 2008

Description:

Outlines the NNI strategy for nanotechnology-related environmental, health and safety (EHS) research.  Includes an analysis of EHS research needs outlined in the previously published NNI document, Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials (September 2006) and a summary of the then-current NNI EHS research portfolio across five primary research categories: (1) Instrumentation, Metrology, and Analytical Methods; (2) Nanomaterials and Human Health; (3) Nanomaterials and the Environment; (4) Human and Environmental Exposure Assessment; and (5) Risk Management Methods.  Also includes an analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in the then-current NNI research portfolio, a recommended framework for addressing the identified research needs, and a recommended implementation and adaptive management process.  Tables showing research projects funded in 2006 by NNI agencies in each of the five EHS research categories are included as an appendix.


Nanotechnology Fact

Nanotechnology has the potential to create many new jobs across a variety of sectors. While some jobs, will require an advanced degree, a 2014 study funded by the National Science Foundation points out that 2-yr and 4-yr training with access to continuing and technical education will be sufficient for many of the future positions in nanotechnology, nanomanufacturing, and beyond.                                                                                                             

Previous estimates stated that 6 million nanotechnology jobs will be needed by 2020, with 2 million of those jobs in the United States (Roco, Mirkin, and Hersam 2010). According to the U.S. News/Raytheon analysis, the number of STEM jobs increased 20 percent between 2000 and 2014. Looking ahead, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that between 2012 and 2022, employment in occupations that NSF classifies as science and engineering (S&E) will increase 15 percent. To find out about nanotechnology programs at college and graduate levels, see College and Graduate Programs. If you are interested in 2-year degrees or training programs, see Associate Degrees, Certificates, & Job Info.

 

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