QEEN Workshop: Speaker Presentations Day One

Subject Area:
NNI Publications and Reports
NNI Workshop Agendas and Presentations
EHS-related Documents
Author: Various
Publication Date: Aug. 18 2015

Description:

Speaker presentations from day one of the CPSC workshop “Quantifying Exposure to Engineered Nanomaterials from Manufactured Products – Addressing Environmental, Health, and Safety Implications.” 

Please see the full QEEN workshop agenda for talk abstracts.

Please see the Workshop Report for a summary of the proceedings.

Go to QEEN Workshop: Day Two Speaker Presentations.


Day One: Quantifying Exposure Across the Life Cycle

Morning Plenary Moderator: Treye Thomas (CPSC)

Welcoming Remarks Treye Thomas Leader, Chemical Hazards Program (CPSC)
Lloyd Whitman, Assistant Director, Nanotechnology  (OSTP)
George Borlase, Assistant Executive Director, Hazard Identification and Reduction  (CPSC)
Introduction: The application of exposure science to the consumer product life cycle Paul Westerhoff Arizona State University
Occupational Exposure: Review of the state of the science Chuck Geraci NIOSH
Consumer Exposure: Health risk driven exposure assessment for consumers during the life cycle of nanomaterial-containing products Jim Zhang Duke University
Ecological Exposure: Review of the state of the science Bernd Nowack Empa

 

Concurrent Sessions

Worker Exposure Studies

Co-Chairs: Kevin Dunn (NIOSH) and Bruce Lippy (CPWR)

Do studies of release from manufactured nanocomposites inform potential for worker exposure? S. Froggett—Froggett & Associates
Exposures to nanoparticles and fibers during manufacturing, recycling, and post-processing of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites D. Bello—UMass Lowell
Carbon nanotube exposure assessment: An evaluation of workplace exposures in the U.S. M. Dahm—NIOSH
Development of a nanoparticle sampler for particle speciation using electron microscopy G. Casuccio—RJ Lee Group, Inc.

 

Consumer Exposure Studies I: General Products

 

Co-Chairs: Marina Vance (VTech) and Keana Scott (NIST)

Environmentally relevant exposures to nanomaterials in consumer products J. Shatkin—Vireo Advisors, LLC
Potential inhalation exposures for nanoparticles due to the use of consumer products G. Mainelis—Rutgers University
Quantifying the release of silver from nanotechnology-based consumer products for children M. Vance1*, N. Tulve2, R. Willis2, K. Rogers2, T. Thomas3, L. Marr11Virginia Tech, 2EPA, 3CPSC
Characterization of mechanical and UV-induced nanoparticle release from commercial products L-P Sung1, K. Scott1, and T. Thomas21NIST, 2CPSC

 

Consumer Exposure Studies II: Food, Food Contact and Personal Care Products

 

Co-Chairs: Timothy Duncan and Margaret Kraeling (FDA)

Challenges in the characterization of nanomaterials relevant to cosmetics and personal care products J. Ansell—Personal Care Products Council
Using dietary intake modeling to project human intake of nanomaterials present in agricultural foods and commercial products S. Ebbs—Southern Illinois University
Studies on the potential of nanoparticles to migrate from polymer nanocomposites for food packaging R. Franz—Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering & Packaging IVV
Nanomaterial cosmetic research at the Food and Drug Administration L. Katz FDA

 

Ecological and General Population Exposure Studies

 

Co-Chairs: Elijah Petersen (NIST) and Jeff Steevens (USACE)

Quantification of carbon nano materials in complex matrices P. Westerhoff1*, K. Doudrick2, P. Herckes1, and T. Nosaka11Arizona State University, 2University of Notre Dame
A liquid nebulization / differential mobility analysis (LN/DMA) method for valid sizing and quantification of engineered nanoparticles in environmentally-relevant water matrices B. Mader*, M. Ellefson, and S. Wolf—3M Environmental Laboratory
An exploration of some capabilities and limitations of single particle ICP-MS K. Murphy* and A. Montoro Bustos—NIST
Accumulation and trophic transfer of engineered nanomaterials by plants J. White—CT Agricultural Experiment Station

 

Roundtable—Exposure Science in the 21st Century:

How its principles can transform safe and sustainable innovation and development of nanomaterial products

 

Moderator: Treye Thomas (CPSC)

 

Afternoon Plenary Moderator: Janet Carter (OSHA)

Concurrent Sessions Roundtable: Comparison of exposure assessment in different receptor populations Moderator: Janet Carter (OSHA)
U.S.-EU Collaboration on Exposure: The Exposure Through Product Life CoR Martie van Tongeren Institute of Occupational Medicine & Rick Canady NeutralScience L3C

 

Evening Poster Session Featuring the QEEN New Investigator Poster Competition

 


Nanotechnology Fact

Nanotechnology encompasses science, engineering, and technology at the nanoscale, which is about 1 to 100 nanometers. Just how small is that? A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter. For reference, a sheet of paper is about 100,000 nanometers thick. Nanoscale matter can behave differently than the same bulk material. For example, a material’s melting point, color, strength, chemical reactivity, and more may change at the nanoscale.

Researchers seeking to understand the fundamentals of properties at the nanoscale may call their work nanoscience; those focused on effective use of the properties may call their work nanoengineering. Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at the nanoscale.

Learn more in the Nano 101 section.

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